Jell-O Easter Eggs Recipe on justataste.com

Jell-O eggs manage to tackle two holidays in one. Not only are they guaranteed to steal the snack spotlight this Easter, but they also serve as the ultimate fake food for April Fool’s Day.

I will admit that this edible craft takes a bit of skill and patience, but the effort is well worth it once you catch someone cracking an egg into a hot skillet and ending up with scrambled Jell-O. And who can beat the presentation of a brightly colored treat served in a stark white shell?

I first fell in love with using eggs as serving containers when I made Thomas Keller’s iconic Truffled Egg Custards during one of the final modules of culinary school. The end result features a creamy custard served inside hollowed out egg shells garnished with paper-thin potato-chive chips.

Thomas Keller Truffled Eggs Recipe

My apologies to Chef Keller, but I took your custard down a notch and replaced it with … Jell-O. But Chef Keller wasn’t the only inspiration for this faux treat, as you may remember the Spanish food blog La Receta de la Felicidad’s egg-shaped brownies that took the food blogosphere by storm last December.

So, long story short:

Thomas Keller + Spanish food blogs + my love of dessert = Jell-O eggs.

And that right there, my friends, is a perfect window into how my brain works. Scary, right?

To make this edible craft in your own home, you’ll need:

  • One dozen eggs
  • A push-pin
  • Several packets of Jell-O (bright colors work best)
  • A fine pastry tip
  • Duct tape

Begin by using the push-pin to puncture two small holes in opposite ends of one egg.

Jell-O Eggs Made Out of Real Eggs

Blow the egg whites and yolks out of the egg (you may have to increase the size of the hole on one end), and then thoroughly wash it out with hot water or boil the shells. Keep in mind that eggs can carry salmonella, so the hotter the water and the stronger the pressure, the better.

Jell-O Eggs Made Out of Real Eggs

Once clean, firmly fix a piece of duct tape (or any other incredibly strong tape) over one of the holes. Place the egg, tape-side down, back into the carton and repeat the hollowing out process with the remaining eggs.

Jell-O Eggs Made Out of Real Eggs

Prepare the Jell-O according to package instructions and then insert the pastry tip into the top hole of the hollowed out eggs and pour in the Jell-O until the egg is full. The Jell-O will be hot, so pour carefully and slowly to ensure the eggs don’t overflow.

Jell-O Eggs Made Out of Real Eggs

Transfer the carton of eggs to the fridge and chill them until the Jell-O has fully set, at least three hours. Once firm, crack off the shells and enjoy!

Jell-O Eggs Made Out of Real Eggs

Craving more? Sign up for the Just a Taste newsletter for a second fresh serving of content straight to your inbox each week! And stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter for all of the latest updates.


Feeling social?

Share this recipe!

Categories

Related Recipes

Check out more crave-worthy favorites

Kelly Senyei holding a copy of The Secret Ingredient Cookbook

love the recipes on just a taste?

Check out my cookbook!

Order your copy of The Secret Ingredient Cookbook featuring 125 brand-new family-friendly recipes with surprisingly tasty twists!

Join the Conversation

Rate and Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comments

  1. These Jello eggs were a huge hit with my kids and their friends! Thanks so much for making me the new “cool” mom in town! :)

  2. Why didn’t it work?
    I’m concerned that the shell will get stuck in the jello when she peels it — but I haven’t tried it yet.

    Why did you toss the raw egg instead making scrambled eggs?

  3. Waste of time and money – my kid was excited and after following directions and being careful, all we got was a big mess and dozen eggs down the drain.

    I’d like to know how may people who were excited by this post were extremely disappointed in the end. Thanks.

  4. Looks rlly good and very creative! What can you do with the left over eggs? Any suggestions? Where can you get that little tin thing that you used to pour in the jell-o mixture?

  5. How do you coverup the hole that is facing upwards in the container so you do not see the jello in the hole???

  6. When I was a child (I’m 42) my mom would make these the same way with a little deviation. She made two holes in the egg, one at each end, then me and my sisters were in charge of blowing the egg out of the shells. She then proceeded to boil the shells to sterilize/clean them. Wow brings back great memories!