I don’t do dough. I don’t do bread. I don’t do yeast. Or so I thought …

Alton Brown first introduced me to the wonderful world of bread-making a few months ago, but it wasn’t until a recent culinary school lesson that I really felt I’d perfected the simple yet finicky process of making dough. Once frozen with intimidation, I can now finally say “Fear not, my fellow dough doubters!” Check the list of tips below then tie on an apron and let the flour-flinging begin with my recipe for The Ultimate Pizza Dough.

Tips + Tricks for Total Doughmination:

  • When dissolving the yeast, use hot water – as in water that’s at a temperature your hand can stand. If your hand likes it, the yeast will like it.
  • Adding a tablespoon of flour to the yeast while it’s dissolving will make for a better rise (better rise = better dough).
  • “Knocking down” the dough refers to throwing it firmly against your work surface while holding on to one end. Fold the dough in half, then do it again. This helps to evenly distribute the yeast.
  • For storing the dough in a “warm dry place,” try your dryer shortly after it’s been used.
bread

The Ultimate Pizza Dough

I don’t do dough. I don’t do bread. I don’t do yeast. Or so I thought … Alton Brown first introduced me to the wonderful world of bread-making a few months ago, but it wasn’t until a recent culinary school lesson that I really felt I’d perfected the simple yet finicky process of making dough. […]
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Servings 3 (12-inch) pizzas

Ingredients 

  • 1 Tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups hot water
  • 1 pound all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • Extra flour for dusting work surface

Instructions 

  • In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast, sugar and 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour in the hot water. Let sit for 10 minutes.
  • Mound the flour on your work surface and sprinkle in the salt. Use a fork to incorporate the two ingredients then form a large well in the center of the flour.
  • Pour the dissolved yeast mixture into the center of the well and then little by little, use a fork to pull flour from the well into the center. Continue until mixture begins to thicken.
  • Using your hands, begin kneading the dough until it comes together. Continue kneading until all of the flour has been incorporated evenly into the dough. Shape it into a ball.
  • Place the dough into a greased bowl and cover it with a greased piece of parchment paper. Let it rest for one hour in a warm, dry place until it doubles in size.
  • Knock down the dough on your floured work surface then cut it into the desired amounts.
  • Place the dough onto a greased cookie sheet and cover it again with a damp towel. Let the dough rise a second time for one more hour.
  • Knock down the dough sections a second time then roll it into the desired shape, top it with your desired toppings and bake it in a 500ºF oven until golden brown.
  • ★ Did you make this recipe? Don't forget to give it a star rating below!

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Nutrition

Calories: 559kcal, Carbohydrates: 117g, Protein: 16g, Fat: 1g, Sodium: 1559mg, Potassium: 174mg, Fiber: 4g, Sugar: 1g, Calcium: 23mg, Iron: 7mg

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Comments

  1. Hello. Looking forward to trying this dough recipe. One part of the instructions has me confused and I have another question..

    1) Instructions say: ‘Pour the dissolved yeast mixture into the center of the well and then little by little, use a fork to pull flour from the well into the center. Continue until mixture begins to thicken.’ Isn’t the well in the center? Shouldn’t I be pulling mixture out from the center?

    2) Should I sift flour before weighing? (I.e., does it make a difference in weight whether it’s sifted first or not?) Thanks so much in advance for clarifying! :)

  2. 5 stars
    Hi Kelly
    Fabulous recipes, as always !
    As one of your fans from the other side of the world, I wondered if it would be possible to list cooking temperatures that everywhere but America uses, ie 450°F/232°C/gas 8. It really would make a difference for all of your non American fans.
    Neil

  3. To make a smaller number of crusts, a search of the internet for the number of cups in 1 pound of all-purpose flour shows a range from 3 1/3 cup to 3 3/4 cup. What is the correct amount?

    1. Hi Lynn! The flour should be weighed on a scale and it’d be closer to 3 1/3 cups. But You’d want to use a scale so it’s more accurate. Hope that helps!

  4. I am a pizza dough novice :-). Can this dough be made the day before you want to use it? Thanks so much!

    1. Hi there, Shiela! Yes, you absolutely can make it ahead of time and keep it sealed in plastic wrap in the fridge :)

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